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ink on paper, 2010. |

 

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He realized he was not falling at all but rising, ink, coffee and gouache on paper, 2010.

 

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arrow-gold-green-down-2(quiet)

 

 

 

 

 

39s

 

 

things never to be revealed, mixed media on paper, 2012.

 

 

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things never to be revealed (detail ), 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, in the omnipresent data storm of the 21st century, the primal appeal of caves takes on a new dimension. The earth, including the ocean floor, is now comprehensively mapped. Caves are not. Google’s camera cars have yet to drive inside them. They remain blank spaces. In a world of instant access, caves are the very definition of slow. In a world of constant presence, caves are aggressively absent. In a world of superficiality, they are profound — literally profound, in the original sense of “deep.” (Latin profundus: “before the bottom.”) This means that we’re even more drawn to them because they preserve something precious that’s becoming hard to find: ignorance, blankness, the integrity of total silence. Today, given that we can know just about anything, a cave is even more of a cave.

-SAM ANDERSON